IELTS Essay: 30 Phrases For 7+ Bands

For writing a compelling piece in IELTS essay, one should be very expressive so that the examiner may have the clarity of opinions or idea. If your ideas have not been articulated well, then your whole effort becomes useless. It will only lead to a disappointing result.

While learning vocabulary may for sure be a tedious task, there are some simpler phrases that you must use in your writing to make it more explicit.

These phrases are easier to remember, yet it is vital that you understand where you have to use them and where you should not. Just equip yourself with the following words and you will be able to write brilliant essays, that are both argumentative and persuasive.

For a general explanation

1. In order to

Use: to express the purpose of something.

Example:

“Physical training has been introduced in schools in order to combat the problem of lethargy and obesity in students.”

2. In other words

Use: to present the same idea in an alternate way, so as to simplify it or put extra emphasis on it.

Example:

“Money can sometimes lead to huge disputes in the family. In other words, you cannot buy ultimate happiness even with your money.”

3. Another way to put it

Use: This has the same purpose as ‘in other words’. This phrase can also be used to express an idea differently.

Example:

“Advertisements are a great way to increase the value of the product in the consumer market. Another way to put it is that marketing is vital for any company to uplift its product’s popularity among consumers.

4. That is to say

Use: To bring more precision to your argument by explaining it in detail.

Example:

“Fashion never stays constant. That is to say that men and women follow different trends of lifestyle in different decades.”

For writing a compelling piece in IELTS essay, one should be very expressive so that the examiner may have the clarity of opinions or idea. If your ideas have not been articulated well, then your whole effort becomes useless. It will only lead to a disappointing result.

While learning vocabulary may for sure be a tedious task, there are some simpler phrases that you must use in your writing to make it more explicit.

These phrases are easier to remember, yet it is vital that you understand where you have to use them and where you should not. Just equip yourself with the following words and you will be able to write brilliant essays, that are both argumentative and persuasive.

 

For a general explanation

1. In order to

Use: to express the purpose of something.

Example:

“Physical training has been introduced in schools in order to combat the problem of lethargy and obesity in students.”

2. In other words

Use: to present the same idea in an alternate way, so as to simplify it or put extra emphasis on it.

Example:

“Money can sometimes lead to huge disputes in the family. In other words, you cannot buy ultimate happiness even with your money.”

3. Another way to put it

Use: This has the same purpose as ‘in other words’. This phrase can also be used to express an idea differently.

Example:

“Advertisements are a great way to increase the value of the product in the consumer market. Another way to put it is that marketing is vital for any company to uplift its product’s popularity among consumers.

4. That is to say

Use: To bring more precision to your argument by explaining it in detail.

Example:

“Fashion never stays constant. That is to say that men and women follow different trends of lifestyle in different decades.”

 

To add additional information

You can replace ‘and’ with:

5. Moreover

Use: Moreover is used in the beginning of a sentence. It is used to give extra information to support your idea or argument.

Example:

“Moreover, homework helps students in making a routine of their studies, therefore they become quite essential for them.”

6. Furthermore

Use: similar to ‘moreover’. Used at the beginning of the sentence, this too is used to add some information.

Example:

“Furthermore, many recent findings too have suggested that use of social media has escalated amongst youth.”

7. What is more

Use: again, adding more information to substantiate the truth of the argument. Used in the beginning of sentences.

Example:

“What is more is that people these days are a lot more worried about their image on the social media handles rather than their personal relationships.”

8. Another point to keep in mind

Use: to replace also. You can give another significant detail for your idea.

Example:

“Exams show you the mirror, telling you the level at which you stand currently. Another point to keep in mind is that if exams will not be conducted, then people will not take their studies seriously.”

9. As well as

Use: to give another reason for the idea. Use in place of ‘also’.

Example:

“innovations in communication technology have diminished the limitations that people had to reach out to each other physically in their personal lives as well as professional.

10. Not only…but also

Use: to explain two pieces of information. Something that is quite surprising or awe-inspiring.

Example:

“Not only do people find loudspeakers quite annoying and distracting, but also suffer physically due to them.”

11. Coupled with

Use: To join two ideas or arguments.

Example:

“Coupled with the fact that many people were able to reap its benefits, it could be safely assumed that the move was a big achievement for the government.”

12. Firstly; Secondly; Thirdly

Use: To give a vivid presentation and state all the ideas one by one.

Example:

“Firstly, traffic influx causes environmental problems. Secondly, it is also the cause of noise pollution. Thirdly, it leads to jams, which gets many people late.”

13. Not to mention

Use: to bring more emphasis while adding extra details.

Example:

“Natural disasters kill millions of people everywhere all over the world, not to mention, the vast loss of property that it causes.”

 

To show contrast or comparison

To replace ‘but’, you can use:

14. However

Use: ‘However’ can be used to present an opposing statement to what you said previously.

Example:

“Internet is a vast reservoir of knowledge and thus has proven to be of great advantage to mankind. However, this is not why most people use the internet, since, they waste most of their time on watching shows on the internet that are not informative.”

15. On another hand

Use: To present an opposite opinion related to the same statement.

Example:

“Many firmly believe that capital punishment should not be given as it too means committing murder, on the other hand, some believe that it is the only effective way to inculcate fear amongst criminals and therefore should be given to serious offenders.”

16. That being said

Use: To contradict the statement that you made prior to this.

Example:

“Having a single international language is beneficial as it decreases language barriers between people. That being said, many people try to adapt it so well that they even ignore their own native languages, which is quite detrimental to the growth of that particular language.”

17. In contrast/comparison

Use: As their names suggest, you use ‘in contrast’ to state an opposite opinion and ‘in comparison’ to compare two opinions.

Example:

“Older people generally believe that social media is a tedious, waste of time and should have limited use. In contrast, younger generation hold the view that social media is a great way to connect with distant friends and relatives and is more convenient in comparison to the traditional methods of communication through phones or e-mails.

18. Yet

Use: For the introduction of an idea that is contrasting.

Example:

“Though many who chose arts or commerce instead of science achieved success and made loads of money, yet parents still force their children to take science for their higher studies.”

 

Limitation or a condition of a topic

19. Despite

Use: Use ‘despite’ or ‘in spite of’ to state a point that is valid even if there is some limitation with the statement.

Example:

“The research shows that population explosion will lead to an acute shortage of water as potable water will be exhausted. Despite this fact (or in spite of this fact), people continue to misuse it.”

20. Provided that

Use: This too means that there is some condition to the statement, which cannot be ignored.

Example:

“In my opinion technology should be used for the comforts of human beings, provided that it does not harm the environment.”

21. In view/ In light

Use: If we want to bring something to someone’s attention or shed some light on it, we can use these.

Example:

“In light of recent events, I believe there should be stricter policies for tourism in our country.”

22. Nonetheless

Use: This too represents ‘despite this’.

Example:

“It was unconventional for Indians to watch so much violence in movies, nonetheless, the series became immensely popular with Indian youth.”

23. Notwithstanding

Use: This too is a synonym of ‘nonetheless’ or ‘despite this’.

Example:

“Notwithstanding the fact that resources are being overused for its mass-production, electricity is unarguably one of man’s greatest creations.”

 

To give examples

24. For instance

Use: to give one example

Example:

“Tourist places are of great importance to our nation, for instance, Taj Mahal is not just a relic of a very important phase of the history of our country, but also is a part of the coveted list of ‘seven wonders of the world’.

25. To illustrate

Use: To give an example to give a clearer picture of the ideas.

Example:

“Sports are necessary for the overall development of a child. To illustrate, we can consider the difference in the energy between an athletic student and a non-athletic one. Definitely, the former will be more energetic.”

26. To exemplify

Use: Again to give examples

Examples- “Smoking is hazardous for health. To exemplify, one can look at the increasing rate of throat and lung cancer cases in recent years due to this habit.

27. Significantly

Use: to emphasise on a point so as to bring more attention to it.

Example:

“Significantly, there is a rapid rise in the demand for smartphones that are loaded with numerous features.”

28. Notably

Use: Same as significantly, it also tells the reader that this is quite an important point.

Example:

“Notably, the government took a major step towards reducing pollution after banning crackers on Diwali.”

 

To conclude

29. In conclusion

Use: It is used to present the main gist of the essay or its central idea.

Example:

“In conclusion, after presenting all the ideas, I can safely reconfirm my point of view that extremely loud music should not be completely avoided as it disturbs people and is hazardous for the health of old-aged people and kids.”

30. To summarise

Use: This too is used to gather all your points in the end and just recapitulate them.

Example:

“To summarise, the excellent solution to the problem of increasing illiteracy is making primary education free and compulsory for every child, regardless of their social status.”

Memorizing these words and practicing them daily will be more beneficial and effective rather than rote learning a few tough vocabulary words. These words can fit in any essay and are thus flexible. A contrasted vocabulary can only help you a little bit.

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